15 Pond Plants for Zone 7 (Hardy Picks)

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Designing a captivating pond in USDA Hardiness Zone 7 opens up a world of possibilities, thanks to the diverse array of aquatic plants that thrive in this temperate climate. This curated list of 15 pond plants showcases species that are well-adapted to the growing conditions in Zone 7, offering a range of colors, textures, and growth habits to enhance the beauty and ecological balance of your water garden.

From the timeless elegance of water lilies and lotuses to the bold, architectural statements of papyrus and taro, each plant brings its own unique charm and benefits to the pond ecosystem.


Breathtaking, floating flowers in a spectrum of colors, from pure white to deep red, with round, glossy leaves. Plant in containers filled with aquatic soil, and submerge them at the appropriate depth. Fertilize monthly during the growing season for a stunning display of blooms.


2) Lotus (Nelumbo spp.)

Lotus flower
Chihiro H, CC BY 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons

Magnificent, large flowers in shades of pink or white, rising above the water on sturdy stems, accompanied by unique, blue-green, waxy leaves. Plant rhizomes in heavy clay soil, positioning the growing tips just above the soil surface. Fertilize sparingly and marvel at the exotic beauty of these ancient aquatic treasures.


3) Pickerelweed (Pontederia cordata)

Pickerelweeds
Forest and Kim Starr / CC BY 2.0

Vibrant, purple-blue flower spikes above glossy, heart-shaped leaves, creating a striking vertical accent. Plant in shallow water or at the pond’s edge to attract pollinators and provide shelter for wildlife. Remove any yellowing leaves to keep it looking its best.


4) Cattail (Typha latifolia)

Cattails
Joost J. Bakker / CC BY 2.0

Tall, slender leaves with iconic brown, cylindrical flower spikes, adding a classic touch to your pond. Plant in shallow water or wet soil, and control its spread by removing excess growth. Use it to create a natural privacy screen or backdrop for other pond plants.


5) Variegated sweet flag (Acorus calamus ‘Variegatus’)

Variegated sweet flag
Krzysztof Ziarnek, Kenraiz, CC BY-SA 4.0, via Wikimedia Commons

Striped, green-and-white, grass-like leaves with a delightful aroma when bruised. Plant in shallow water or moist soil to add a pop of color and texture. Trim any brown tips to maintain its fresh appearance.


6) Cardinal flower (Lobelia cardinalis)

Cardinal flower
R. A. Nonenmacher, CC BY-SA 4.0, via Wikimedia Commons

Brilliant, red, tubular flowers on tall spikes, irresistible to hummingbirds and butterflies. Plant in moist soil or shallow water, in areas with partial shade. Deadhead spent blooms to encourage continuous flowering throughout the season.


7) Yellow flag iris (Iris pseudacorus)

Yellow flag iris by the water
Marc Ryckaert, CC BY-SA 4.0, via Wikimedia Commons

Sunny, yellow flowers above sword-like, green leaves, bringing a cheerful glow to your pond. Plant in shallow water or moist soil, and divide the rhizomes every few years to control growth and rejuvenate the plant.


8) Creeping Jenny (Lysimachia nummularia)

Creeping Jenny in bloom
Sten Porse, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons

Trailing, golden-green foliage that softens pond edges and can be used as a charming floating plant. Grow in moist soil or shallow water, and trim back the stems as needed to control its spread.


9) Arrowhead (Sagittaria latifolia)

Arrowhead leaves
USFWS Mountain-Prairie / CC BY 2.0

Distinctive, arrow-shaped leaves and delicate, white flowers on tall stalks, adding a unique texture to your pond. Plant in shallow water or wet soil, and enjoy the intriguing foliage. Remove any yellowing leaves to keep it looking tidy.


10) Water hibiscus (Hibiscus moscheutos)

Water hibiscus flowers
Photo by David J. Stang, CC BY-SA 4.0, via Wikimedia Commons

Enormous, showy flowers in white, pink, or red, resembling exotic tropical blooms. Plant in moist soil or shallow water, in full sun to partial shade. Prune back the stems in late winter to encourage vigorous new growth.


11) Papyrus (Cyperus papyrus)

Papyrus plants
C T Johansson, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons

Tall, graceful stems topped with feathery, green umbels, adding a striking architectural element to your pond. Plant in shallow water or moist soil, and enjoy the gentle rustling of the leaves in the breeze. Trim back any brown or yellowing stems to maintain its elegant appearance.


12) Water canna (Canna glauca)

Water canna
Zhangzhugang, CC BY-SA 4.0, via Wikimedia Commons

Vibrant, yellow or orange flowers above lush, blue-green, paddle-shaped leaves. Plant in shallow water or moist soil, in full sun to partial shade. Remove spent flower stalks to encourage continuous blooming and trim back foliage in late winter.


13) Umbrella palm (Cyperus alternifolius)

Umbrella palm
Tau Ľolunga, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons

Long, slender stems topped with umbrella-like, green leaves, creating a tropical feel. Plant in shallow water or moist soil, in full sun to partial shade. Trim back any yellow or brown leaves to keep it looking lush and healthy.


14) Taro (Colocasia esculenta)

Taro leaves
Scot Nelson / No copyright

Impressive, large, heart-shaped leaves in shades of green or purple, adding a bold, tropical touch to your pond. Plant in shallow water or moist soil, in full sun to partial shade. Fertilize regularly during the growing season for optimal growth and remove any yellowing leaves.


15) Powdery thalia (Thalia dealbata)

Powdery thalia in water
KATHERINE WAGNER-REISS, CC BY-SA 4.0, via Wikimedia Commons

Tall, slender stems with blue-green, powdery leaves and delicate, purple flowers. Plant in shallow water or moist soil, in full sun to partial shade. Remove spent flower stalks to maintain its neat appearance and trim back foliage in late winter.

Chris G
About the author

Chris G

Pond consultant and long-time hobbyist who enjoys writing in his spare time and sharing knowledge with other passionate pond owners. Experienced with pond installation, fish stocking, water quality testing, algae control and the troubleshooting of day-to-day pond related problems.

Read more about Pond Informer.

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